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Spring Walk #2

First of all, I want to correct a mistake in last week's blog. The Gertrude Boyden Refuge is the correct name of last week's walk. For some reason, I kept referring to it as the Borden Refuge. My apologies for that!


This week I would like to highlight the Hewitt's Pond Preserve in Raynham. I discovered this beautiful walk taking the back roads of Raynham to my sister Cindy's house. It is located at the end of Rogers Street off North Main Street. Raynham is a town of many small ponds, some better known than others. Hewitt's Pond is one of the latter. The town of Raynham acquired this property in 1978. It is a sprawling 38.8 acre preserve with a freshwater pond as well as a well-groomed trail. At any given time, in any season, you can observe all sorts of wildlife. In the spring and summertime especially, there are birds chirping in the branches and painted turtles sunning themselves on the rocks. I have witnessed toads hopping beside me on the trails and great blue herons wading through the wild iris and lily pads. The preserve is open from dawn to dusk and there is some parking along the end of Rogers Street.

The maintenance and preservation of the pond and the trails is a cooperative effort between the Division of Conservation Services and the Raynham Conservation Commission. The Raynham Boy Scouts have also been instrumental in clearing debris from the paths and creating a map of the preserve.

Hewitt's Pond features an abundance of fish. Catfish, Crappie and trout make this area a favorite for anglers. There is easy access for kayaks and canoes as well.

The trail partway around the pond leads into the sports fields of the Raynham Middle School. By the way, there are two small swamps on either side of the pond featuring their own special ecosystems. There are also two small bridges where the water overflows.

If you go, you are going to find tree - shaded trails, as well as sandy areas. It is a wonderful spot for getting some exercise, an afternoon of fishing, or simply taking some great photographs.




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