Search

Ojos De Dios - God's Eye

The craft of creating an Ojos de Dios, or God's Eye involves the placing of two sticks, branches or dowels in the formation of a cross and then weaving between the four sides with yarn or ribbon, string or macrame cord until a diamond - like pattern is created. This process is actually hundreds of years old. God's Eyes were first made by the Huichol, an indigenous people of western Mexico. They were used to decorate altars and homes, even battle shields.

When the Spanish colonists arrived in this region in the early 1500s, they brought with them many Roman Catholic missionaries, who changed the name of these charms to Ojos de Dios, or Eyes of God. They realized that the Huichol people had a great reverence for these brightly woven pieces and began using them in their own rituals.

Many other indigenous communities in Northern Mexico and even the American Southwest created their own version of God's Eyes. The four points of the "eye" represented the four elements, fire, earth, air, and water. The center of the design was believed to be a passageway between the spirit world and the mortal world. The portal was a way for the gods to protect their worshippers, and the worshippers were able to request aid from the gods.

In more modern times people still have created God's Eyes, but much of the spiritual meaning has been lost. During the late 1960's they were widely adopted by counterculture movement without referring to the original meaning. Many Christian organizations claimed the craft as their own.

I became interested in God's Eyes because of their ancient significance, worship of nature and the earth. I love to go on walks to find the ideal materials for the formation and embellishment of my pieces. By incorporating the natural world into my designs, I try to create highly original pieces. Many of my God's eyes become the center of dreamcatchers, combining two ancient Indian arts. I mix a variety of sizes and colors, and each one has something unique included. I often custom design my Ojos, including specific objects or requests.








11 views0 comments